#7 Chris Brogan: You’re It (Part 2)

Podcast outro song: Double Life, by HASH / CC BY-NC-ND 4.0
 

“I tend to not believe in the larger system,” Chris Brogan told me in part 1 of our interview. And that’s where we pick up in part 2 — with a discussion about why Chris has little or no faith in the ability of the government and our political system to address the economic problems we face, individually and as a society.

We talk about Uber, the sharing economy and the people who work in it, the Great Depression, and lots more.

And yes, there will be a part 3… coming soon.


Show Notes

  • Chris Brogan
  • Uber
  • sharing economy
  • The sharing economy is a lie: Uber, Ayn Rand and the truth about tech and libertarians, by Richard Eskow

    “Disruptive companies talk a good game about sharing. Uber’s really just an under-regulated company making riches. … Uber is the poster child for the pro-privatization, anti-regulatory ideology that ascribes magical powers to technology and the private sector. It is deeply a political entity, from its Nietzschean name to its recent hiring of White House veteran David Plouffe. Uber is built around a relatively simple app (which relies on government-created technology), but it’s not really a tech company. Above all else Uber is an ideological campaign, a neoliberal project whose real products are deregulation and the dismantling of the social contract.”

  • Benjamin Walker’s Theory of Everything (podcast), including his 3-part series Instaserfs (about the sharing economy)
  • serfdom
  • Susie Cagel is quoted in this episode talking about the sharing economy. Her clip is taken from Benjamin Walker’s Theory of Everything (Instaserfs, part 2). And I trust I’m using the clip here under “fair use.”
    Ms Cagel is a columnist at Al Jazeera America and Pacific Standard, and a frequent contributor of journalism for other outlets such as the Guardian, Forbes, Next City, and others. She’s a 2015-2016 John S. Knight Journalism fellow at Stanford, a summer 2015 artist in residence at BAVC, and a 2014 Online Journalism Award winner. Susie is currently working on an illustrated book about boom and bust economics in California.
  • Chris Brogan: “The person who emails me isn’t engaging in philosophy….” (at 33:12). Clearly, Chris isn’t getting any email from this guy.

photo of Chris Brogan courtesy of Raul Colon

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#4 David Cay Johnston: The Great Divide

Podcast outro song: Double Life, by HASH / CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

In his new book, Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality, journalist David Cay Johnston assembles an impressive group of thinkers, writers, and (political) leaders who understand the possibilities — and the limits — of capitalism. Adam Smith, Paul Krugman, and Joseph Stiglitz… Mike Rose, Barbara Ehrenreich, and Robert Kuttner… Studs Terkel, Elizabeth Warren, President Barack Obama, and many others describe the societal risks of letting the gap between the haves and the have nots become too wide.

From David’s introduction:

“Inequality is about much more than just incomes or wealth…. Inequality is also about access and opportunity, which are much harder to measure. Education, health care, and exposure to environmental hazards all shape society, affecting who gets a shot at success and who gets success handed to them; who can overcome obstacles and who has those obstacles cleared away for them.

The single most important point of Divided is: keep in mind who benefits and who does not. It’s our choice. We decide. And we are free to make choices that will strengthen our society so that America, and the liberties of the people, will endure.”

Amen to that.

Show notes

David-Cay-Johnston-sqDavid Cay Johnston is currently a Distinguished Visiting Lecturer at Syracuse University’s Law School. Prior to that, he was a reporter at The New York Times, where he won the Pulitzer Prize for a series of stories that exposed loopholes and inequities in the U.S. tax code. From 2012 to 2014, David was president of Investigative Reporters & Editors. David is also a contributing editor at Newsweek, a columnist for Al Jazeera America, and a frequent guest on MSNBC, PBS, CNN, Fox, and NPR. And with his appearance here at Entrepreneur Explosion, David has finally reached the very top of the media food chain. Congratulations, David! (And thanks for doing this interview.)

Divided-Johnston-cover

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Hindenburg-logoSpecial thanks to our sponsor: Hindenburg Systems, creator of Hindenburg Journalist PRO, the only audio editing system built exclusively for radio journalists and raconteurs. With features that automatically ensure broadcast quality results, Hindenburg Journalist PRO lets you focus on what you do best: telling your story in sound.

Hindenburg. It’s all about the story.

 

Robert Reich: Truth Teller or Party Pooper?

You make the call!

Robert-Reich

Robert Reich

… The rise of “independent contractors” Is the most significant legal trend in the American workforce – contributing directly to low pay, irregular hours, and job insecurity.

What makes them “independent contractors” is the mainly that the companies they work for say they are. So those companies don’t have to pick up the costs of having full-time employees.

But are they really “independent”? Companies can manipulate their hours and expenses to make them seem so.

It’s become a race to the bottom. Once one business cuts costs by making its workers “independent contractors,” every other business in that industry has to do the same – or face shrinking profits and a dwindling share of the market

Some workers prefer to be independent contractors because that way they get paid in cash. Or they like deciding what hours they’ll work.

Mostly, though, they take these jobs because they can’t find better ones. And as the race to the bottom accelerates, they have fewer and fewer alternatives.

→ from Why We’re All Becoming Independent Contractors, by Robert Reich